Reflective Liquid type Photoshop Tutorial

Tutorials on creating metal type abound online, as do variations on simple liquid effects. Most are fairly short, offering a good foundation for the reader on how certain effects are achieved but fail to take that extra step (or few steps) to make the piece really shine…

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Difficulty 6/10
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Reflective Liquid type Photoshop Tutorial

Reflective Liquid Type by Al Ward

Tutorials on creating metal type abound online, as do variations on simple liquid effects. Most are fairly short, offering a good foundation for the reader on how certain effects are achieved but fail to take that extra step (or few steps) to make the piece really shine. Once you have an idea of how different techniques fit together in a piece, it is fairly easy to combine, say, the process to create metal and the process to create liquid to create something that exists in both sides of the FX map.

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Step 1

image01Create a new image with the following attributes:

Width: 11 inches
Height: 11 inches
Resolution: 300 ppi, 8bit
Background Color: White
Color Mode: RGB (Important or it won’r work)

 

Step 2

image02Since the desired effect is to appear liquefied, a font that appears to have been made with a crayon or round brush will work perfectly. Select the Type tool and open the Character palette from the Options bar. The font I’ve chosen is called ‘WallowHmkBold’… if you do not have this installed on your system just use the font of your choice. The attributes for the characters are seen below:

 

Step 3

 

image03Note that the color is gray in the #666666 range and NOT stark black.

Type a word across the face of the image.

 

Step 4

image04

Rasterize the type layer, then paint a few additional gray dots around the type.

image05

Step 5

Open the Channels palette and duplicate a channel… the Blue channel will work fine. Go to Image>Adjustments>Invert.

image06

Step 6

Open the Filter menu and select Blur>Gaussian Blur. First, blur the channel at a 25 pixel radius. Blur the channel again at a radius of 15 pixels.

image08

image07

 

Step 7

Turn on all the other layers (Click the eye to the left of RGB)

Turn off the Blue copy channel, but don’t delete it… you’ll need it in a moment or two.

Click on the letters RGB to make sure that th RGB channel is active.

image09

 

Step 8

Go to Filter>Render>Lighting Effects. Set it up as outlined in the image below… be sure to select the Blue copy channel as the Texture Channel.

image10

 

Make sure you change the light angle and shape on the left by dragging the 4 dots

 

Step 9

The result of all that is a pretty basic bevel, and yes, you could do pretty much the same thing with a layer style. Some habits die hard, however, and I like the end result better when channels come into play. What can I say? I’ve been doing it this way since at least PS 6, and if it ain’t broke, don’t fix it!

image11

 

Step 10

Duplicate the text layer and go to Filter>Sketch>Chrome. Set up the reflections as seen in the dialog box below:

image12

 

Step 11

Now you can play with Layer Styles a bit. Open the Layer Styles dialog box and select Bevel/Emboss. Enter the following settings… note that the Shadow color is again gray in the #666666 range and not black. Make sure the Gloss Contour is changed to cone.Once done click OK.

image13image14

Step 12

Make a Curves adjustment layer and Levels adjustment layer with the settings seen here:

image15image16

Step 13

Against a black background the shine really comes out.

image17

Step 14

Turn off the background layer or layers (if you added the black separately) and merge all the others together.

image18

 

Step 15

To give the type an enhanced liquid quality, go to Filter>Liquify. Use the Bloat tool to expand or otherwise warp areas of the text as seen here. Once you are happy with the distortions, click OK.

image19

Step 16

You can now throw the text into any image you so choose. In the following example, I’ve blurred a tech-style background, placed the type in that document, then placed a duplicate of the blurred layer above the text. The Blend mode of the top layer is changed to Soft Light to serve as reflections off the type, or making the type appear transparent allowing you to see the background through it. I’ll let you decide what is actually happening.

image20

That’s it for now. Until next time

image21

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Colin Smith

Colin Smith

Colin Smith is founder of the #1 PhotoshopCAFE online community which has received over 30 million visitors. Colin has Authored/Coauthored 18 books. He has won numerous awards including 3 Guru awards. He’s been nominated for the Photoshop Hall of Fame twice. Colin is a regular columnist for Photoshop User Magazine. He’s been featured in almost every major imaging magazine, and is in high demand as a speaker at major industry events including Flash Forward and WPPI . He consults such companies as ABC Disney, Apple and Adobe

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Colin Smith

About Colin Smith

Colin Smith is founder of the #1 PhotoshopCAFE online community which has received over 30 million visitors. Colin has Authored/Coauthored 18 books. He has won numerous awards including 3 Guru awards. He’s been nominated for the Photoshop Hall of Fame twice. Colin is a regular columnist for Photoshop User Magazine. He’s been featured in almost every major imaging magazine, and is in high demand as a speaker at major industry events including Flash Forward and WPPI . He consults such companies as ABC Disney, Apple and Adobe