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Thread: Fabric Manipulation Techniques -Advanced Tutorial

  1. #1
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    Fabric Manipulation Techniques -Advanced Tutorial



    I had thought that the Glass Orbs Tutorial would be the only tutorial I would make, as I did not want to create any which I had seen done before.

    While working on a manipulation using a photo of my friend, Sanju; I discovered the cotton shirt he was wearing wasn't very interesting. I embarked on an exploration of Photoshopís abilities, trying to change the very fabric he wore into something else. I discovered a lot while trying this, and hopefully through this tutorial you will discover something too.

    IMPORTANT> This technique is a fairly easy one, but requires a good understanding of Photoshop and its factors. I am taking it for granted that people who are following this tutorial are already mid level photoshoppers at least. This is because this is not a tutorial which can be blindly followed, but rather a technique that can be applied in many different ways once understood. Due to this various things will not be explained, for example what the curves table is, how to mask and cut images, etc.


    Fabric Manipulation Techniques




    1. Take a photo of anyone at all... preferably wearing light coloured/white cotton for the base of this technique, but once you learn it, you can manip any fabric to a certain degree. You can use the photo of my friend Sanju here to practice the manip if you want.




    2. Select out the guy's outline. Copy and drop the guy into a white backdrop for now. You can implant the final set into any BG.




    3. Go to Image/Adjustments/Levels and to Image/Adjustments/Brightness contrast. Adjust both till you get a bright and suitably lighted image. This adjustment depends wholly on the image that you manipulate the main reason why I cannot give you any particular setting. (And also why I mentioned a need for a level of Photoshop knowledge)

    Now separate the cloth into a separate layer, so that it can be manipulated without distorting the skin of the wearer. Let cloth layer be on top. The flesh layer will not undergo any more changes for the rest of this tutorial.




    4. Select the cloth layer. Now go to Image/adjustments/Curves (or Ctrl+M) to open the curves option. Here adjust the curve in about the same way shown in fig.4. You should get a similar output; else adjust the shape of the curve to gain this effect. Here we are bringing in variations to the cloths normal material.




    SHINY FAUX LEATHER

    5. Press CTRL+SHIFT+U to completely desaturate the cloth, as shown in fig5.




    6. Now go back to the curves table, and set the curves at approximately the curve shown in fig6. Here we are deepening the tone of the cloth, and increasing the shininess of the fabric. This creates a High Shine Faux Leather look.




    SHINY LEATHER

    7. For this look, start over from step 4. After completing step 4, instead of completely desaturating the cloth, just open the Hue/Saturation table (CTRL+U) and desaturate a bit, so that the colour variation is muted. See fig7. For the settings I used.




    8. Now open the curves table again. Check fig8 for the curve I put to use. Here your aim is to increase the darkness but to keep in mind the grey variation that should come in. The curve bar here finishes off with a slightly grey look, and thus requires further curve manipulation.




    9. So open the Curve option once again, and deepen the blackness of the material. Leather is a bit muted too. Check Fig9 for my setting. This finishes your leather look.




    VELVETISH/ HARD

    10. Carry on from the leather material in no.9. Now duplicate the cloth layer. CTRL select the cloth in the Layers Tab so as to edit only the material. Now apply the noise filter (a judicious amount of noise> should be very less but enough to bring in some texture) Keep the selection on and run a Gaussian blur of value 1-2. Just put enough blur to soften the cloth but not to lose all details.




    11. Now change the duplicated layers layer option from normal to difference. This forms in your velvet style cloth.




    12. To make the cloth look of thicker material, simply duplicate the blurred layer, with the difference layer option intact. Look at fig11 and 12 to see the difference.




    SATIN SILVER

    13. This is another option to go to after completing step5 of this tutorial. Simply take the desaturated cloth layer, and open the curves bar. Here now make a curve which goes upward more in order to change portions of the black-grey into silver, while maintaining the folds. Also to increase the shininess of the material.




    COLOURED VERSIONS

    14. Taking on from the shiny leather layer step, I simply went ahead and used the Hue/Saturation table (CTRL+U) to change the colour of the cloth. Keeping the colourise option selected, I manipulated the sliders to whatever colour I liked.

    ************************************************** **********************************************

    As I had said, if you are a newbie, a lot of this will be flying over your head. But if anyone requires help with understanding this technique, or any part of this tutorial, just leave a line at the Photoshop cafe forum. This after all is not a tutorial to do a particular staid thing that I am showing here; rather it is the presentation of a technique that will enable you to understand how to manipulate fabric materials in Photoshop. I had converted this same cloth into denim, though that needs more work. Hopefully using the ideas shown here, you will be able to create any sort of cloth manipulation. You just need to logically discern the difference in materials, and work them out,

    Love,
    Vinesh V George


    [Edited on 5/2/2005 by Omengeorge]

  2. #2
    Barrista dcloud's Avatar
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    Now that's the kind of tutorial they should have in Photoshop User magazine (instead of some overpaid NAPP professional making RCA jacks). Very well done.

    - dc

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    Barrista
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    Wonderful, thank you! It's properly bookmarked for later use.

  4. #4
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    GREAT TUT!!! I already have a miilion bookmarks and it will get lost. SO instead when I want it, I'll just go ask emm! lol

    L8r,

  5. #5
    Barrista
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    organization is the key, dear.
    You know where to find me.

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    Thanks Dcloud, now all i need isto get PS User mag to post this tute
    Emm and Rigrider, thanks.... ' emm da official bookmark organiser'. sounds good.
    love,
    Omen

  7. #7
    Barrista
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    That (ditto to Doug) seriously whips all the "big-shot" tutorials out there. Brilliant George, thanks! No doubt it can be used for mroe than shirts!

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    Thanks John... and Im sure this techiniques gonna be eaten up by you too..
    hmm noticed somehting..should i rewrite this a bit..asin explain all the nitty gritty details like curve manipulation etc, so that it becomes more approachable for beginning photoshoppers too?
    wondering whether this tute needs a more simplified writing..hm
    love,
    Vinesh

  9. #9
    Barrista
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    Very very nice tutorial indeed George. Easily worthy of a gold trophy in such Photoshop magazines

    Some of the final results look very good and very real. Well done!

    PS. Uni keepin' ya busy?

  10. #10
    Barrista
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    Did you pay the model?

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